Diabetic Coma

Diabetic Coma
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Diabetic ComaJuvenile diabetes is also known as type 1 diabetes, because most of the cases of type 1 start in childhood and with young adults.  The juvenile diabetes research foundation can help with many details about this major diabetic form, which needs daily insulin injections, mist, or a pump to keep people healthy.  Many children today are at risk due to obesity, nutrition, and poor health.  Diabetes is not contagious for families or anyone else.  There is no cure, but many studies are ongoing and people with diabetes learn how to keep it under control with exercise, diet and insulin.

This type 1 insulin-dependent diabetes has clinical trials now and then so check with your doctor if you’d like to try one.  Your health is often dependent on blood sugar levels.  When people have a well-oiled pancreas, it makes plenty of insulin.  Your body then uses this hormone to change glucose in your blood into energy for fuel.  This glucose most often comes from foods and drinks we ingest.  A type one (juvenile) diabetic doesn’t have any insulin.  Hypoglycemia occurs when insulin production drops.

This is why it’s important to monitor children with diabetes so you can help them to learn how to help themselves.  A serious condition called ketoacidosis occurs when high blood sugar levels aren’t taken care of.  If not remedied, this can lead to coma and death.  Non-diabetics don’t have to worry about the balance between insulin and food.  They have a perfectly functioning pancreas.  It will generate as little or as much insulin as is needed to handle the quantity of food eaten.  Insulin is not required for all types of diabetes.

Diabetes can be pre-diabetes, type 1, type 2, called diabetes mellitus, or be gestational (in women who are pregnant).  The more information you gather up about the different types of diabetes, the better off your family will be as knowledge still means power.  Juvenile diabetes (type 1) means that diabetes in children requires insulin to maintain the child’s health.  This can be done by injection, an insulin pump, or inhalation.  An overdose or eating too much can cause hypoglycemia.  Juvenile diabetes treatment most commonly needs hypoglycemia care as this is most frequent with kids.  It needs immediate remedial action.

Childhood diabetes (type 1) patients often struggle about how much insulin to inject.  There is no way to figure out exactly what the right amount is.  That’s why you have to keep an eagle eye out for symptoms of diabetes in children.  Stress, foods with different absorption rates in the body, stress at school or illness, can cause fluctuations and make for some variance in juvenile diabetes symptoms.  Insulin needs change as kids grow up.  If a guess at the insulin levels which are needed is inaccurate, high or low blood sugar may be a problem.

If someone has consistently high blood sugar levels over a period of years, it can cause serious damage to a person’s organs and bodily systems.  Complications may occur in the nerves, kidneys, heart, eyes, as well as other parts of the body.  Wherever your blood flows to, and it’s everywhere, that part of a body could be affected by blood sugar levels.  Monitor levels carefully and you or your child should be fine.

People with diabetes can live as active and normal a life as anyone else.  New technologies and research such as with stem cells is being conducted all over the world.  Clinical trials to help bring the disease of diabetes under control and eventually find a cure, are being done with cells, how a drug can affect a kid who has diabetes, and under many other circumstances and in many areas.  If your child or loved one has type 1 or juvenile diabetes, then gather up all of the information you possibly can about it.  Ask your doctor or other health care pros about diet, exercise, meal plans and needed medications or routines.

When you start on a course of living with type 1 diabetes, collect recipes that everyone in the family will enjoy  A diabetic’s diet is actually a healthier one and all can benefit.  It means a balance between fats, protein, carbs and fiber.  Go for natural and organic foods and use single ingredients as much as you can.  The least that the food is processed, the better.  If there’s an exotic food you want to try, always check with your health care provider first.  If you don’t know what the food is or what’s in it, it could have an affect on your child’s juvenile diabetes.

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