Gestational Diabetes Meal Plan

Gestational Diabetes Meal Plan
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Gestational Diabetes Meal Plan

Gestational diabetes Meal PlanBeing pregnant has its own set of challenges and carefully following a gestational diabetes meal plan might be one of the changes you need to make for your health and the safety and proper development of your unborn baby.

Eating well is not a difficult diet plan to follow as it points to the best nature has to offer: fresh fruits and vegetables. Vegetables that are leafy and dark green (Kale, spinach and the like) have tons of great vitamins that give your baby a great start in life and also helps to keep the gestational diabetes in check.

What a gestational diabetes meal plan is all about is not so much to diet as we know it, it is to help you make a conscious effort to select better choices of food to help keep your blood glucose levels on an even keel.  Without driving yourself crazy thinking you are all on your own you should be under a doctor and dietician’s care over this gestation period where you will be advised of your daily requirements. Fat should be a part of a gestational diabetes meal plan, but only up to 30% of the caloric intake that is consumed daily.

Gestational Diabetes Meal PlanFurther tips on your Gestational Diabetes Meal Plan

It is highly recommended to eat every 3 hours or so; consuming small meals and snacks at regular times during the day.  An erratic eating schedule is sure to throw off your blood sugar levels.

Breakfast, in this case should consist of mostly proteins, some fats and very few carbohydrates.  Some excellent breakfast choices would be:  one egg, whole wheat toast with just 1 teaspoon of margarine that is free of trans-fat.  Fruit should be part of the diet with some grapes as an example.  Don’t forget to incorporate non-fat milk or yogurt as it is important to provide calcium that is necessary for the mommy and baby.

Don’t forget healthy snacks:

Excellent mid-morning snack options could include: an apple with peanut butter and a 12 ounce glass of non-fat milk or some cottage cheese with fruit or a ½ of peanut butter and jelly sandwich on whole wheat bread with a side of non-fat milk.

Lunch should be full of color and nutritional vitamins and minerals; add a ½ cup of fresh tomatoes to a whole wheat pita pocket filled with tuna or chicken salad, add some fresh spinach on the side or within the sandwich for some delish flavor.

A mid afternoon snack can be the same as the mid- morning snack, but for a change, some cheese (the soft variety) spread over a small (or ½ of regular size) bagel should be very satisfying.

Dinner time offers a great variety of protein options, such as chicken (make sure it is skinless) or fish and an internet search will provide you with millions of ways to easily prepare a meal in a healthy fashion.  Rice and green beans would make a lovely side dish.  Some strawberries for dessert are the perfect ending to this meal.

Please note that to properly follow a gestational diabetes meal plan; if you remain awake 3 hours after supper and your blood sugar level readings are low; some peanut butter on whole wheat crackers and a glass of milk will stabilize your glucose levels and help provide a restful nights sleep.

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