Truths about Hypo Diabetes (Hypoglycemia)

Hypoglycemia
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Hypo Diabetes (Hypoglycemia)Hypo diabetes or hypoglycemia is when your bloods sugar falls below normal blood glucose levels. Not everyone with hypoglycemia have the same symptoms, it can change from person to person. Hypoglycemia usually occurs in patients that are suffering from (type 1 or type 2) diabetes, and are trying to regulate their blood sugar levels.

People who are pre-diabetic are also at risk of hypoglycemia, if they have prolonged periods of fasting. The body requires energy to work, and the brain requires sugar almost exclusively to function properly.  The onset of hypoglycemia will normally begin when the blood glucose level falls into the mid 70’s, and will begin to exhibit symptoms when the levels fall into the 60’s depending on the individual.

 Symptoms that may be exhibited by hypoglycemia are;

  • Nervousness
  • Palpitations
  • Confusion
  • Blurred vision
  • Changes in mood
  • Sweating
  • Hunger
  • Hard to concentrate
  • Trembling
  • Weakness
  • Trouble speaking, coma and possible seizure

It is important to note, that these hypoglycemia symptoms are likely to vary from one person to another. Any diabetic who has had an experience of hypoglycemia will describe the most noticeable symptoms as an intense urge to eat, and to bring the blood sugar level back to normal levels.

If symptoms present themselves for hypo diabetes following should be followed:

1. Drink a glass of fruit juice or soda (non-diet)
2. Chew on a couple of LifeSavers candy and other type of candy is fine also. Good idea to carry a roll with you at all times)
3. Eat a piece of fruit
4. A couple of glucose tablets, if available
5. If the person is unconscious, rub honey or jam on the insides of the person’s cheeks, and call for medical assistance.
6. If possible, a family member should be trained in giving an injection of a 1mg dose of Glucagon, the standard adult dose.

Hypo Diabetes (Hypoglycemia)It is startling to realize that in theUSA, about one third of the people that are diabetic are unaware that they are. Then there are those that are aware that they have type 1 diabetes; however the symptoms of hypoglycemia do not always present themselves; when this happens the person is then suffering what is called hyperglycemic unawareness.

This will usually occur with persons who have had numerous incidents of hypoglycemia and the body gets used to the lower glucose levels. When this happens, it is advised that the patient liberalize their target glucose level. In addition, these episodes of hypoglycemia unawareness will at times disappear as the amount of hypoglycemia episodes decline.

In order to prevent episodes of hypoglycemia from occurring the following should be followed:

Maintain regular eating habits
Have snacks between meals
Monitor your sugar level regularly
Educate yourself with Blood Glucose Awareness Training (BGAT)
If you maintain a healthy lifestyle and monitor you sugar regularly, you should be able to manage hypo diabetes (hypoglycemia).

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